Istanbullied Berlin
Wish I was here!
somewhereintheworldtoday:

Make a big splash and get a soaking for good luck!
The Songkran Festival is the traditional Thai New Year where families and friends gather together to visit temples, sprinkle water on Buddha deities and on each other to wish good luck. This quickly turns into people roaming the streets with containers of water or supersoakers in order to drench anyone that passes! The more water you have thrown over you the luckier you are!
Songkran 2011 Water Festival-12 by Aung@, on FlickrSongkran 2011 Water Festival-12 by Aung@, on FlickrSongkran 2011 Water Festival-12 by Aung@, on Flickr</ More on Songkran Festival by Somewhere in the world today…
Picture: Songkran 2011 Water Festival-12 by Aung@, on Flickr

Wish I was here!

somewhereintheworldtoday:

Make a big splash and get a soaking for good luck!

The Songkran Festival is the traditional Thai New Year where families and friends gather together to visit temples, sprinkle water on Buddha deities and on each other to wish good luck. This quickly turns into people roaming the streets with containers of water or supersoakers in order to drench anyone that passes! The more water you have thrown over you the luckier you are!

Songkran 2011 Water Festival-12 by Aung@, on FlickrSongkran 2011 Water Festival-12 by Aung@, on FlickrSongkran 2011 Water Festival-12 by Aung@, on Flickr</ More on Songkran Festival by Somewhere in the world today…

Picture: Songkran 2011 Water Festival-12 by Aung@, on Flickr

somewhereintheworldtoday:

In Spain they throw tomatoes, in Italy its oranges!
You may have heard of La Tomatina, the famous Spanish tomato fight in August, but during the ancient Italian Carnival of Ivrea, in Piedmont, they throw oranges!
More on Storico Carnevale di Ivrea, Battle of the Oranges by Somewhere in the world today…
Picture: Oranges by occhiobliquo, on Flickr

somewhereintheworldtoday:

In Spain they throw tomatoes, in Italy its oranges!

You may have heard of La Tomatina, the famous Spanish tomato fight in August, but during the ancient Italian Carnival of Ivrea, in Piedmont, they throw oranges!

More on Storico Carnevale di Ivrea, Battle of the Oranges by Somewhere in the world today…

Picture: Oranges by occhiobliquo, on Flickr

Fallen Leaves exhibit at the Jewish Museum in Berlin  (at Jüdisches Museum | Jewish Museum)

Fallen Leaves exhibit at the Jewish Museum in Berlin (at Jüdisches Museum | Jewish Museum)

nprfreshair:

Aziz Ansari on what his parents think of his chosen profession:

My parents have seen me do stand-up. I did Carnegie Hall January of last year. And a few days before, I thought, ‘I have to fly my parents in to see this.’ … I was a little worried that they would be offended by some of the bits. There’s some pretty harsh stuff. But the positives outweigh the negatives. And after the show, they didn’t say anything about the language. Someone was sitting next to my parents and saying they were laughing the whole time. They weren’t getting offended. Maybe every now and then my mom put her hands in her face, but I think any mom would do that with some of the stuff I say. Stand-up comedy is a raunchy profession.”

(Source: playstationthreeisonhiatus)

This is what I woke up to&#8230;.SNOW :)

This is what I woke up to….SNOW :)

// Crellemarkt: Turkish market 5 large steps from our front door//

Crellemarkt

Berlin is filled with incredible Turkish markets in various areas of the city, the most notable being the big Turkish market in Kreuzberg on Maybachufer.  Friday, we visited this market, it was about a 50 minute walk from our apartment, and it was wonderful, but we were freezing. 

Cheese form the market:

Cheeesssee!!!

So this morning, Joe and I were relieved to find another Turkish market about a block away from our apartment.  It is a bit smaller than the market in Kreuzburg, but you can get everything you need there for reeeaallll cheap.

Crellemarkt

 It called the Crellemarkt on Crellestraße in Schöneberg. It’s held every Tuesday and Saturday, where you can find everything from coats and phone chargers, to produce and fish.  

Fish at the Crellemarkt

There are tons of freshly baked Turkish delicacies, of which we are very familiar with, and are happy to have in Berlin.  Our small knowledge of Turkish comes in handy here in the way of personal entertainment; it always baffles the vender when we ask, “ne kadar?” (how much?) or say “teşekkürler” (thank you), they can’t seem to figure out if they should respond in Turkish or German. 

Turkish goodness at the Crellemarkt

We came home with some spicy arugula, 6 avocados, a kilo of pears, 8 lemons, and 100 grams of extra spicy peppers, for a grand total of €4.29. 

produce from the market

Crellemarkt

Location: Wednesdays and Saturdays at Crellestraße and Großgörschenstraße

Hours: 10 - 15:00 supposedly, but today the market was bumpin’ well after 15:00. 

// "Go back to where you came from!"//

Deportation, something I never thought I would face until last Tuesday.  While I do feel slightly bad-ass for being deported, it is also a huge pain in the ass.  Joe and I were heading back to Turkey after a five day vacation in Bavaria, Germany which consisted of eating more pork product and German beer than a person can handle, when we were illegally denied entry back into Turkey.  Here’s how it went down:

As we were flying back to Istanbul, we knew we might run into a little trouble at the border, considering we overstayed our visitors visa.  From everything we know, the law states that Americans who make an appointment for thier residence permit prior to the end of their 3 month tourist visa are permitted to be in the country (considering how backed up the appointments are, we made ours in June and the first available appointment wasn’t until October).  The rule is to carry around a color copy of the appointment confirmation in order to prove you are legally in the country.  So we assumed we would hand the officers our passports and our color copies and be sent on our way.  Unfortunately, the passport control officer sent us to the head of police who determines your fate, in or out.  

He was a gigantic dick. Of course, his English was terrible so communication quickly broke down.  Think of any of your preconceived notions about how a person in a country like Turkey might act when deporting you, and it’s probably fairly accurate. I felt like I was in Midnight Express. Midnight express

The officer, yelling in broken English, said, “this is nothing, just paper,”  and adding a phrase I never thought I would hear, “go back to where you came from.”   We have been told in Turkey that you can solve anything with either a Turkish person or money, so I immediately got my employer on the phone, she was confident that she could persuade him, but after 15 minutes of the two exchanging what sounded like unpleasantries,  he asked us if we would like to pay a fine to re-enter in 3 months or not pay a fine and be banned for 5 years. Fresh off of vaction, we didn’t have enough cash to pay the 600 lira fine, and asked for the nearest ATM.  He pointed it out, and went over to drain our accounts, except the ATM was broken!  When we explained this to the police officer he simply said, “not my problem.”   Two gentlemen who were also in a predicament  told us that the officers had escorted them to an ATM in a different part of the airport.  We asked the officer if he could escort us to a different ATM and he explained to us, “we do not do that, it is illegal.” He would not budge on this stance, and our fate was determined.  We are banned from Turkey for five years. 

Lets back track and talk about the two gentlemen I mention who informed us about the police escort.  Being deported sounded pretty bad ass until we met these two gentlemen.  One man is a journalist and the other a photographer and they were deported from Syria to Turkey for entering Syria illegally, and were trying to get back into Turkey to do it all over again.  They were really nice guys and I hope where ever they are, they are safe, considering the day after we met them Syria and Turkey began to exchange fire across borders. 

They didn’t exactly send us “back to where we came from” they sent us back on the first flight to Munich. Our passports were taken from us for security measures and we were escorted to a terminal where we could hang out from 1:00 am to 5:00 am. We slept, we walked around, all in disbelief that we were being deported.  We had to sign something that said we would be responsible to pay back Turkish airlines an undiscolsed “Euro” amount within 15 days. I wonder how many people actually pay that back?  Then we were escorted to our flight and off to Munich.  

When we landed in Munich, the very sweet German police were awaiting our arrival. They asked us what happened, responded as though this wasn’t the first time this has happend with people trying to re-enter Turkey, and welcomed us into Germany. Icing on the cake, the Istanbul airport forgot to forward our checked bag back with us to Munich, even though we asked them to make sure they did so about 7 times. Off to lost luggage we went, and a very lovely German women helped us, she also indulged us in horror stories she has heard about the Istanbul airport, making us feel all the more at ease.  

From here our first stop was Starbucks to use the free wifi and begin to figure out what the hell to do!  We found the cheapest route to Italy and decide to begin a two day journey that would take us to my family’s house in Italy.  If it weren’t for this incredible family, we would have been, well, screwed.  We began our train descent South from Munich, through Austria, and into Italy, finally making it to Pescara at 20:00 the following evening where we were greeted by my amazing family and taken to their beautiful home! It was hard to be upset about our deportation as we were traveling through these breath-taking European countries.  For now, we are in Italy,  spending time with some incredible people and figuring out our next move. We are no longer Istanbullies, for now we are nomads, until we find our next semi-permanent location. 

Dare I say this brewery is better than Aecht Schlenkerla? (Scattata con Instagram)

Dare I say this brewery is better than Aecht Schlenkerla? (Scattata con Instagram)

Passing time while waiting for the train in Freising (Scattata con Instagram)

Passing time while waiting for the train in Freising (Scattata con Instagram)

Oh bacon! How I&#8217;ve missed you!
Pig products, they exist here, it&#8217;s just really expensive, considering most people won&#8217;t eat pig, ya know, the Muslim thing and whatnot. When I was teaching one of my 5-year-old students (who is not brought up in a religious household) animal names, we were discussing which animals we eat, I said &#8220;pig,&#8221; and he said, &#8220;why would you ever eat a pig?&#8221; My response, &#8220;because they are tasty!&#8221; He laughed.
Going from a diet of bacon and pork at least once a week to a diet of zero pig sucks.  So with the help of some expat friends we found this little gem called Egg and Burger. It is an American style dinner with a neon-lit sign outside, and black and white tile inside. 
We were advised to get the BLT, fries and a milkshake.  The BLT is only 9TL (about 4USD) which is very cheap for pig in this country, and is as good as any BLT at a dinner in the States. Buttered, toasted bread, a generous portion of bacon, mayo, tomato and lettuce.  Or maybe it was so good simply because I haven&#8217;t had bacon is so long&#8230;either way, it does the trick if you find yourself with a craving for pig in Istanbul. And the milkshake wasn&#8217;t half bad either.
Next stop for pig product, Germany&#8230;only 4 days away&#8230;.

Oh bacon! How I’ve missed you!

Pig products, they exist here, it’s just really expensive, considering most people won’t eat pig, ya know, the Muslim thing and whatnot. When I was teaching one of my 5-year-old students (who is not brought up in a religious household) animal names, we were discussing which animals we eat, I said “pig,” and he said, “why would you ever eat a pig?” My response, “because they are tasty!” He laughed.

Going from a diet of bacon and pork at least once a week to a diet of zero pig sucks.  So with the help of some expat friends we found this little gem called Egg and Burger. It is an American style dinner with a neon-lit sign outside, and black and white tile inside. 

We were advised to get the BLT, fries and a milkshake.  The BLT is only 9TL (about 4USD) which is very cheap for pig in this country, and is as good as any BLT at a dinner in the States. Buttered, toasted bread, a generous portion of bacon, mayo, tomato and lettuce.  Or maybe it was so good simply because I haven’t had bacon is so long…either way, it does the trick if you find yourself with a craving for pig in Istanbul. And the milkshake wasn’t half bad either.

Next stop for pig product, Germany…only 4 days away….

From Philly to Europe
expat life
travel, deportation and discovery
created by
one cool ass couple